Pierrot (also known as Gilles)

Pierrot (also known as Gilles)
Jean-Antoine Watteau
c. 1718-19; Oil on canvas; 184 x 149 cm;
Musée du Louvre, Paris

One of the few things we can be sure about, in this famous but
enigmatic work, is the fact that Gilles is a Pierrot. Watteau may have
painted it as a sign for the café run by the former actor, Belloni,
who made his name as a Pierrot. The model, a friend or another actor,
is unknown. Standing with his arms dangling at his sides, with a
dreamy, naive look on his face, the moonstruck Pierrot stands out
monumentally and idiosyncratically against a leafy Italianate
background. At the foot of the mound, reminiscent of a fairground
stage, four half-hidden figures--the Doctor on his donkey, Léandre,
Isabelle and the Capitaine--contribute to the singularity of the
composition and the poetic drama.

Pierrot (also known as Gilles)
 Jean-Antoine Watteau
 c. 1718-19; Oil on canvas; 184 x 149 cm;
 Musée du Louvre, Paris
 
 One of the few things we can be sure about, in this famous but
 enigmatic work, is the fact that Gilles is a Pierrot. Watteau may have
 painted it as a sign for the café run by the former actor, Belloni,
 who made his name as a Pierrot. The model, a friend or another actor,
 is unknown. Standing with his arms dangling at his sides, with a
 dreamy, naive look on his face, the moonstruck Pierrot stands out
 monumentally and idiosyncratically against a leafy Italianate
 background. At the foot of the mound, reminiscent of a fairground
 stage, four half-hidden figures--the Doctor on his donkey, Léandre,
 Isabelle and the Capitaine--contribute to the singularity of the
 composition and the poetic drama.